The Fooditect Begins

April 17, 2017

Alright, this has been a long time in the making but after many attempts to start I've recently come across some good advice: just jump in. 

 

I spent a super long time drafting up this problem statement that in the end I will never live up to. Ridiculous. If this is going to be something that I enjoy doing day to day it has to be in the light of a fast-paced-never-enough-time mentality. Quick posts on two of the things I love: Food and Architecture.  Simple. So, it here goes.

 

Wish me Luck!

 

Overly pretentious problem statement:

 

Can I identify a framework of rules towards the art of food so that when creating, I create within a set of proved successful food syntax guaranteeing an element of success? 

 

My mind is imprinted with buildings, details, and problem solving as a result of my training and profession in Architecture. In a dimension parallel to Architecture I never stop thinking about food. One of the beauties of designing Architecture is that it is never done. I think this is a direct indication of the creative & competitive workings of the brain. The designer is never finished, always looking to improvement, changes, and criticism. The next best high. I feel that way about food too. The cook is never done, always looking for the next best. But, like Architecture, the cooking process must come to an end so that people may enjoy. The mind however continues in a mad rush of processes. Winding through neural pathways, moving on to the next design challenge, but because of the functional aspects of food the process must come to an end.

A favorite book of mine: 'Urban Code 100 Lessons for Understanding the City by Anne Mikoleit and Moritz Pürckhauer' relays to the reader the concept that :: Cities are made of scenes and each scene is built from a passive set of syntax flowing directly from the people who inhabit it. The unspoken rules provided by these scenes build a framework for scholars to observe, analyze, and draw lessons from. Through observations we, Architects, Urban Planners, etc, might be able to enforce these rules in built environments; creating successful cities, buildings, spaces, and rooms based off of the syntax previously created by humans. Can this concept directly translate to the creation of food? Are there rules passively developed by humans to meet an epicure’s standards? Can I observe my own creations in the kitchen, experiences in restaurants, and friends’ cooking to learn what these rules are?  

 

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